Color Contact Lenses near Stoughton
Color Contact Lenses near me
Encompass.marketing
FAQ's
(781) 784-8284,  5 N. Main St  Sharon, MA  02067


#10 Can contact lenses hurt my eyes?
Properly used and cared for contact lenses are safe for your eyes. Contact lenses are made of special materials which are very gentle to the surface of the eye.

Failure to follow your maintenance plan, wearing your contact lenses for too long, not washing your hands before cleaning them, and/or cleaning them improperly can result in eye irritation or infection.

Your eye health is our number one priority. We will work closely with you to ensure optimum eye health and vision.


Didn't see your question addressed here? Please email David Hazell at FAQs@sharonoptical.center.




Color Contact Lenses near me
FAQ's
(781) 784-8284,  5 N. Main St  Sharon, MA  02067

Contact Lenses near me
Color Contact Lenses near Stoughton
Contact Lenses near me
5 N. Main St   Sharon, MA 02067
(781) 784-8284
  The lens is made for the individual patient and the specific frame.
The computer program will calculate the optical performance of thousands of locations covering the progressive lens surface, taking into account many parameters.

This creates an annoying and sometimes dangerous intensity of light that we experience as glare. When you wear polarized sunglasses, that glare is eliminated and clarity is greatly increased.
In order to have success with progressive lenses, you have to understand and accept the visual system that it forces you to live within and you have to be able to adapt to the sensations it gives you. The difference between some lenses and others is that the better lenses have wider fields of vision and less peripheral distortion. Of course, they need to be fit and manufactured properly.
Next, put a little amount of dishwashing detergent on your fingers and apply to each lens washing them gently. This will do a great job at cleaning without scratching. When you are done washing, rinse the glasses under the faucet again using your fingers to feel when all the soap is off the lenses. Shake much of the water off the lenses and blot it dry with a soft and absorbent paper towel
If you are out and about and you can’t clean your glasses like this, blow as much of the dust and dirt that you can off the lenses and rub off any smudge you might have with an appropriate cleaning cloth. Be careful - if you have dirt on the lens, you will grind it in with the cloth causing it to scratch.

The material used in the contact lens is carefully produced to allow as much oxygen as possible to get to the surface of your eye, as well as to be as comfortable and safe as possible.


However, contact lenses take more time and require more responsibility. For example:

Contact lenses do need to be carefully cleaned and maintained according to the instruction of your doctor and lens manufacturer.
Contact lenses have a maximum wearing life and need to be replaced regularly.

#6 Should I get contact lenses?
Many people who currently wear eyeglasses can wear contact lenses. When you come in for your appointment, Dr. DuBrow or Dr. Newman can help you decide whether contact lenses are right for you.

Contact lenses have several advantages over eyeglasses. For example:
During an eye exam, ask a Doctor if contact lenses are right for you. If you experienced problems in the past, be sure to mention them so the Doctor can take this into consideration and make a recommendation. You just might be surprised at how far contact lenses have come - and how much you might like wearing them.


Wear Type Characteristics

Disposable Contact Lenses
Disposable contact lenses are the most highly-recommended lenses. This type of contact lens offers far more benefits than any other lens type. Disposable contact lenses are worn and discarded every one to two weeks. The lenses require less care than daily wear soft contact lenses, as they are replaced more often. Doctors believe frequent replacement reduces the risk of infection. Disposable contacts are available in several materials, including the latest technology silicon hydrogels.

Daily Wear Soft Contact Lenses
These lenses are worn on a daily basis and are removed nightly to be cleaned. One pair of daily wear contact lenses will last six months to one year, depending on the practitioner's prescribed wearing schedule. These lenses are handled more frequently, which can result in lost or torn lenses. Toric lenses are also available, for patients who need a correction for astigmatism.
Opaque
In an opaque tinted contact lens, the part of the lens which covers the colored area of your eye (the iris) is tinted with color so deeply that it blocks out the natural color of your eye. This type of lens can change, for example, brown eyes to blue. Your vision is not tinted - the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. These are also referred to as colored contact lenses.


#9 What if I decide that contact lenses aren't right for me?
Some people experience some difficulty upon their first "contact" with contact lenses. This is normal - after all, you're putting something in your eye!



#1 What's the difference between digital and analog progressive lens technology?
Digital technology uses Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery. The CNC machine makes thousands of cuts in all the different planes on the back surface of a single vision spherical lens. This is done to a very high degree of accuracy for a specific ophthalmic prescription.
#2 What do polarized sunglasses do?
Light reflected from surfaces such as a flat road or smooth water generally is horizontally polarized. This means that instead of light being scattered in all directions in more usual ways, reflected light generally travels in a more horizontally oriented direction.
#3 Why have I had bad luck with progressive glasses in the past?
Often what people don’t realize is that there are about 300 different brands of progressive lenses and they do not all work the same. The challenge with progressives is that the reading area of the lens is not very wide. And on each side of the usable area is distortion and motion that give you sensations that you “eventually” adapt to.
#4 What's the best way to take care of my glasses?
First of all, they should either be on your face or in a case. Secondly, the safest most effective way to clean them is to first rinse the glasses under the faucet to remove dust and dirt off the lenses. This is the primary reason they get scratched.
#5 What is a contact lens?
A contact lens is a very thin piece of sterile, specially-formed material which is placed on the eye as a method of correcting vision. It actually "contacts" with the eye. When the contact lens is placed on the eye, it changes the way that light is focused in the eye, and this change in focus corrects vision.
1. Contact lenses allow some people to see more clearly than with eyeglasses because more of the field of vision is corrected.
2. Contacts are not visible to others and do not interfere with appearance. *
3. Contacts are great for sports: better peripheral vision, fit under helmets.
#7 I've tried contacts before, but didn't think they were all that comfortable. Why should I try them again?
Your Doctor is the best person to evaluate your eyes, lifestyle and vision correction needs. The good news is in the past few years many advancements in contact lenses have helped make them even more comfortable.
#8 What types of contact lenses are there?
There are two different ways to categorize contact lenses: wear type and tint type. Most wear types come in most tint types, and vice versa.
These lenses eyes feel moister than some other contacts, and as a result, are considered by many people to be more comfortable.

Visual acuity also increases as new lenses are placed in the eye more frequently. These lenses are usually prescribed to be worn daily and removed at night.
#10 Can contact lenses hurt my eyes?
Properly used and cared for contact lenses are safe for your eyes. Contact lenses are made of special materials which are very gentle to the surface of the eye.

Failure to follow your maintenance plan, wearing your contact lenses for too long, not washing your hands before cleaning them, and/or cleaning them improperly can result in eye irritation or infection.
Your eye health is our number one priority. We will work closely with you to ensure optimum eye health and vision.


Didn't see your question addressed here? Please email David Hazell at FAQs@sharonoptical.center.
It's unlikely, but you might decide that contact lenses aren't right for you. If that happens, we'll return the cost of the lenses minus the exam fee. Or, we'll apply the money you spent on contact lenses toward the purchase of any pair of eyeglasses in our store. There are some restrictions to what you can return, so ask for details at the store.
Color Contact Lenses near Stoughton
Contact Lenses near me
5 N. Main St   Sharon, MA 02067
(781) 784-8284
#1 What's the difference between digital and analog progressive lens technology?
Digital technology uses Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery. The CNC machine makes thousands of cuts in all the different planes on the back surface of a single vision spherical lens. This is done to a very high degree of accuracy for a specific ophthalmic prescription.  The lens is made for the individual patient and the specific frame.
The computer program will calculate the optical performance of thousands of locations covering the progressive lens surface, taking into account many parameters.

#2 What do polarized sunglasses do?
Light reflected from surfaces such as a flat road or smooth water generally is horizontally polarized. This means that instead of light being scattered in all directions in more usual ways, reflected light generally travels in a more horizontally oriented direction. This creates an annoying and sometimes dangerous intensity of light that we experience as glare. When you wear polarized sunglasses, that glare is eliminated and clarity is greatly increased.
#3 Why have I had bad luck with progressive glasses in the past?
Often what people don’t realize is that there are about 300 different brands of progressive lenses and they do not all work the same. The challenge with progressives is that the reading area of the lens is not very wide. And on each side of the usable area is distortion and motion that give you sensations that you “eventually” adapt to. In order to have success with progressive lenses, you have to understand and accept the visual system that it forces you to live within and you have to be able to adapt to the sensations it gives you. The difference between some lenses and others is that the better lenses have wider fields of vision and less peripheral distortion. Of course, they need to be fit and manufactured properly.
#4 What's the best way to take care of my glasses?
First of all, they should either be on your face or in a case. Secondly, the safest most effective way to clean them is to first rinse the glasses under the faucet to remove dust and dirt off the lenses. This is the primary reason they get scratched. Next, put a little amount of dishwashing detergent on your fingers and apply to each lens washing them gently. This will do a great job at cleaning without scratching. When you are done washing, rinse the glasses under the faucet again using your fingers to feel when all the soap is off the lenses. Shake much of the water off the lenses and blot it dry with a soft and absorbent paper towel
If you are out and about and you can’t clean your glasses like this, blow as much of the dust and dirt that you can off the lenses and rub off any smudge you might have with an appropriate cleaning cloth. Be careful - if you have dirt on the lens, you will grind it in with the cloth causing it to scratch.
#5 What is a contact lens?
A contact lens is a very thin piece of sterile, specially-formed material which is placed on the eye as a method of correcting vision. It actually "contacts" with the eye. When the contact lens is placed on the eye, it changes the way that light is focused in the eye, and this change in focus corrects vision.

The material used in the contact lens is carefully produced to allow as much oxygen as possible to get to the surface of your eye, as well as to be as comfortable and safe as possible.
1. Contact lenses allow some people to see more clearly than with eyeglasses because more of the field of vision is corrected.
2. Contacts are not visible to others and do not interfere with appearance. *
3. Contacts are great for sports: better peripheral vision, fit under helmets.

However, contact lenses take more time and require more responsibility. For example:

Contact lenses do need to be carefully cleaned and maintained according to the instruction of your doctor and lens manufacturer.
Contact lenses have a maximum wearing life and need to be replaced regularly.

#7 I've tried contacts before, but didn't think they were all that comfortable. Why should I try them again?
Your Doctor is the best person to evaluate your eyes, lifestyle and vision correction needs. The good news is in the past few years many advancements in contact lenses have helped make them even more comfortable. During an eye exam, ask a Doctor if contact lenses are right for you. If you experienced problems in the past, be sure to mention them so the Doctor can take this into consideration and make a recommendation. You just might be surprised at how far contact lenses have come - and how much you might like wearing them.
#8 What types of contact lenses are there?
There are two different ways to categorize contact lenses: wear type and tint type. Most wear types come in most tint types, and vice versa.

Wear Type Characteristics

Disposable Contact Lenses
Disposable contact lenses are the most highly-recommended lenses. This type of contact lens offers far more benefits than any other lens type. Disposable contact lenses are worn and discarded every one to two weeks. The lenses require less care than daily wear soft contact lenses, as they are replaced more often. Doctors believe frequent replacement reduces the risk of infection. Disposable contacts are available in several materials, including the latest technology silicon hydrogels.
These lenses can feel very moist compared to other lenses. As a result, they're considered by many people to be more comfortable.

Visual acuity also increases as new lenses are placed in the eye more frequently. These lenses are usually prescribed to be worn daily and removed at night.

Daily Wear Soft Contact Lenses
These lenses are worn on a daily basis and are removed nightly to be cleaned. One pair of daily wear contact lenses will last six months to one year, depending on the practitioner's prescribed wearing schedule. These lenses are handled more frequently, which can result in lost or torn lenses. Toric lenses are also available, for patients who need a correction for astigmatism.
Opaque
In an opaque tinted contact lens, the part of the lens which covers the colored area of your eye (the iris) is tinted with color so deeply that it blocks out the natural color of your eye. This type of lens can change, for example, brown eyes to blue. Your vision is not tinted - the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. These are also referred to as colored contact lenses.


#9 What if I decide that contact lenses aren't right for me?
Some people experience some difficulty upon their first "contact" with contact lenses. This is normal - after all, you're putting something in your eye!

It's unlikely, but you might decide that contact lenses aren't right for you. If that happens, we'll return the cost of the lenses minus the exam fee. Or, we'll apply the money you spent on contact lenses toward the purchase of any pair of eyeglasses in our store. There are some restrictions to what you can return, so ask for details at the store.
#6 Should I get contact lenses?
Many people who currently wear eyeglasses can wear contact lenses. When you come in for your appointment, Dr. DuBrow or Dr. Newman-Evans can help you decide whether contact lenses are right for you.

Contact lenses have several advantages over eyeglasses. For example:

#3 Why have I had bad luck with progressive glasses in the past?
Often what people don’t realize is that there are about 300 different brands of progressive lenses and they do not all work the same. The challenge with progressives is that the reading area of the lens is not very wide. And on each side of the usable area is distortion and motion that give you sensations that you “eventually” adapt to.In order to have success with progressive lenses, you have to understand and accept the visual system that it forces you to live within and you have to be able to adapt to the sensations it gives you. The difference between some lenses and others is that the better lenses have wider fields of vision and less peripheral distortion. Of course, they need to be fit and manufactured properly.
#1 What's the difference between digital and analog progressive lens technology?
Digital technology uses Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery. The CNC machine makes thousands of cuts in all the different planes on the back surface of a single vision spherical lens. This is done to a very high degree of accuracy for a specific ophthalmic prescription.  The lens is made for the individual patient and the specific frame. The computer program will calculate the optical performance of thousands of locations covering the progressive lens surface, taking into account many parameters.
#2 What do polarized sunglasses do?
Light reflected from surfaces such as a flat road or smooth water generally is horizontally polarized. This means that instead of light being scattered in all directions in more usual ways, reflected light generally travels in a more horizontally oriented direction. This creates an annoying and sometimes dangerous intensity of light that we experience as glare. When you wear polarized sunglasses, that glare is eliminated and clarity is greatly increased.

#4 What's the best way to take care of my glasses?
First of all, they should either be on your face or in a case. Secondly, the safest most effective way to clean them is to first rinse the glasses under the faucet to remove dust and dirt off the lenses. This is the primary reason they get scratched. Next, put a little amount of dishwashing detergent on your fingers and apply to each lens washing them gently. This will do a great job at cleaning without scratching. When you are done washing, rinse the glasses under the faucet again using your fingers to feel when all the soap is off the lenses. Shake much of the water off the lenses and blot it dry with a soft and absorbent paper towel
If you are out and about and you can’t clean your glasses like this, blow as much of the dust and dirt that you can off the lenses and rub off any smudge you might have with an appropriate cleaning cloth. Be careful - if you have dirt on the lens, you will grind it in with the cloth causing it to scratch.
#5 What is a contact lens?
A contact lens is a very thin piece of sterile, specially-formed material which is placed on the eye as a method of correcting vision. It actually "contacts" with the eye. When the contact lens is placed on the eye, it changes the way that light is focused in the eye, and this change in focus corrects vision.

The material used in the contact lens is carefully produced to allow as much oxygen as possible to get to the surface of your eye, as well as to be as comfortable and safe as possible.
#6 Should I get contact lenses?
Many people who currently wear eyeglasses can wear contact lenses. When you come in for your appointment, Dr. DuBrow or Dr. Newman-Evans can help you decide whether contact lenses are right for you.

Contact lenses have several advantages over eyeglasses. For example:

1. Contact lenses allow some people to see more clearly than with eyeglasses because more of the field of vision is corrected.
2. Contacts are not visible to others and do not interfere with appearance. *
3. Contacts are great for sports: better peripheral vision, fit under helmets.

However, contact lenses take more time and require more responsibility. For example:

Contact lenses do need to be carefully cleaned and maintained according to the instruction of your doctor and lens manufacturer.
Contact lenses have a maximum wearing life and need to be replaced regularly.

#7 I've tried contacts before, but didn't think they were all that comfortable. Why should I try them again?
Your Doctor is the best person to evaluate your eyes, lifestyle and vision correction needs. The good news is in the past few years many advancements in contact lenses have helped make them even more comfortable. During an eye exam, ask a Doctor if contact lenses are right for you. If you experienced problems in the past, be sure to mention them so the Doctor can take this into consideration and make a recommendation. You just might be surprised at how far contact lenses have come - and how much you might like wearing them.
#8 What types of contact lenses are there?
There are two different ways to categorize contact lenses: wear type and tint type. Most wear types come in most tint types, and vice versa.

Wear Type Characteristics

Disposable Contact Lenses
Disposable contact lenses are the most highly-recommended lenses. This type of contact lens offers far more benefits than any other lens type. Disposable contact lenses are worn and discarded every one to two weeks. The lenses require less care than daily wear soft contact lenses, as they are replaced more often. Doctors believe frequent replacement reduces the risk of infection. Disposable contacts are available in several materials, including the latest technology silicon hydrogels.
These lenses can feel very moist compared to other lenses. As a result, they're considered by many people to be more comfortable.

Visual acuity also increases as new lenses are placed in the eye more frequently. These lenses are usually prescribed to be worn daily and removed at night.

Daily Wear Soft Contact Lenses
These lenses are worn on a daily basis and are removed nightly to be cleaned. One pair of daily wear contact lenses will last six months to one year, depending on the practitioner's prescribed wearing schedule. These lenses are handled more frequently, which can result in lost or torn lenses. Toric lenses are also available, for patients who need a correction for astigmatism.

Extended Wear Soft
These lenses are more oxygen-permeable and can sometimes be worn longer than daily wear lenses. Some patients may be able to occasionally sleep in these lenses, but this is determined by the doctor only. The optometrist will set standards for each patient as to how long the lenses should be worn before being removed and cleaned. Since these lenses are handled less frequently, the risk of losing or tearing a lens is somewhat reduced. The lenses, however, are thinner than daily wear soft lenses, and thus must be handled more gently. There is a much higher risk of sight threatening infections with this lens type. Dr. DuBrow and Dr. Newman-Evans rarely recommend this type of lens.
Programmed Replacement Soft
These lenses are also called Frequent Replacement Lenses. They are worn on a daily basis and are thrown away after one to three months of wear, as instructed by the optometrist.

Gas Permeable
Gas permeable contact lenses are most often prescribed to patients with astigmatism. The lenses may, however, be prescribed for spherical patients. These lenses are made of a semi-rigid, silicon-based plastic that allows oxygen to pass through the lens and into the cornea. The gas permeable contact lens is more difficult to adjust to due to the rigidity of the lens. It takes about three weeks of wear to become comfortable with the feel of the lens on the eye.
Tint Type Characteristics

Clear
These contact lenses are completely clear, and they can be difficult to see when cleaning and placing in eyes.

Visibility Tint, also called Handling Tint
These lenses have a very light tint (usually blue) to make them easier to see when handling and cleaning. The tint is very light; it does not "tint" your vision and will not change the color of your eyes.

Enhancing Tint
These lenses have a tint which enhances the color of a similarly-colored eye. For example, if you have light blue eyes, a blue-enhancing tint contact lens will make your eyes appear a darker and more intense blue. Your vision is not tinted; the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. If the lens is chosen well, it is usually difficult for others to notice that you are wearing an enhancing tint contact lens. An enhancing tint cannot change eye color to a different hue (from brown to blue, for example). For that, you need an opaque lens.

Opaque
In an opaque tinted contact lens, the part of the lens which covers the colored area of your eye (the iris) is tinted with color so deeply that it blocks out the natural color of your eye. This type of lens can change, for example, brown eyes to blue. Your vision is not tinted - the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. These are also referred to as colored contact lenses.

#9 What if I decide that contact lenses aren't right for me?
Some people experience some difficulty upon their first "contact" with contact lenses. This is normal - after all, you're putting something in your eye!

It's unlikely, but you might decide that contact lenses aren't right for you. If that happens, we'll return the cost of the lenses minus the exam fee. Or, we'll apply the money you spent on contact lenses toward the purchase of any pair of eyeglasses in our store. There are some restrictions to what you can return, so ask for details at the store.


#1 What's the difference between digital and analog progressive lens technology?
Digital technology uses Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery. The CNC machine makes thousands of cuts in all the different planes on the back surface of a single vision spherical lens. This is done to a very high degree of accuracy for a specific ophthalmic prescription.  The lens is made for the individual patient and the specific frame. The computer program will calculate the optical performance of thousands of locations covering the progressive lens surface, taking into account many parameters.
#2 What do polarized sunglasses do?
Light reflected from surfaces such as a flat road or smooth water generally is horizontally polarized. This means that instead of light being scattered in all directions in more usual ways, reflected light generally travels in a more horizontally oriented direction. This creates an annoying and sometimes dangerous intensity of light that we experience as glare. When you wear polarized sunglasses, that glare is eliminated and clarity is greatly increased.
#3 Why have I had bad luck with progressive glasses in the past?
Often what people don’t realize is that there are about 300 different brands of progressive lenses and they do not all work the same. The challenge with progressives is that the reading area of the lens is not very wide. And on each side of the usable area is distortion and motion that give you sensations that you “eventually” adapt to. In order to have success with progressive lenses, you have to understand and accept the visual system that it forces you to live within and you have to be able to adapt to the sensations it gives you. The difference between some lenses and others is that the better lenses have wider fields of vision and less peripheral distortion. Of course, they need to be fit and manufactured properly.
#4 What's the best way to take care of my glasses?
First of all, they should either be on your face or in a case. Secondly, the safest most effective way to clean them is to first rinse the glasses under the faucet to remove dust and dirt off the lenses. This is the primary reason they get scratched. Next, put a little amount of dishwashing detergent on your fingers and apply to each lens washing them gently. This will do a great job at cleaning without scratching. When you are done washing, rinse the glasses under the faucet again using your fingers to feel when all the soap is off the lenses. Shake much of the water off the lenses and blot it dry with a soft and absorbent paper towel
.
If you are out and about and you can’t clean your glasses like this, blow as much of the dust and dirt that you can off the lenses and rub off any smudge you might have with an appropriate cleaning cloth. Be careful - if you have dirt on the lens, you will grind it in with the cloth causing it to scratch.
Daily Wear Soft Contact Lenses
These lenses are worn on a daily basis and are removed nightly to be cleaned. One pair of daily wear contact lenses will last six months to one year, depending on the practitioner's prescribed wearing schedule. These lenses are handled more frequently, which can result in lost or torn lenses. Toric lenses are also available, for patients who need a correction for astigmatism.

Extended Wear Soft
These lenses are more oxygen-permeable and can sometimes be worn longer than daily wear lenses. Some patients may be able to occasionally sleep in these lenses, but this is determined by the doctor only. The optometrist will set standards for each patient as to how long the lenses should be worn before being removed and cleaned. Since these lenses are handled less frequently, the risk of losing or tearing a lens is somewhat reduced. The lenses, however, are thinner than daily wear soft lenses, and thus must be handled more gently. There is a much higher risk of sight threatening infections with this lens type. Dr. DuBrow and Dr. Newman-Evans rarely recommend this type of lens.
#8 What types of contact lenses are there?
There are two different ways to categorize contact lenses: wear type and tint type. Most wear types come in most tint types, and vice versa.

Wear Type Characteristics

Disposable Contact Lenses
Disposable contact lenses are the most highly-recommended lenses. This type of contact lens offers far more benefits than any other lens type. Disposable contact lenses are worn and discarded every one to two weeks. The lenses require less care than daily wear soft contact lenses, as they are replaced more often. Doctors believe frequent replacement reduces the risk of infection. Disposable contacts are available in several materials, including the latest technology silicon hydrogels.

These lenses can feel very moist compared to other lenses. As a result, they're considered by many people to be more comfortable.

Visual acuity also increases as new lenses are placed in the eye more frequently. These lenses are usually prescribed to be worn daily and removed at night.
Contact lenses have several advantages over eyeglasses. For example:

1. Contact lenses allow some people to see more clearly than with eyeglasses because more of the field of vision is corrected.
2. Contacts are not visible to others and do not interfere with appearance. *
3. Contacts are great for sports: better peripheral vision, fit under helmets.

However, contact lenses take more time and require more responsibility. For example:

Contact lenses do need to be carefully cleaned and maintained according to the instruction of your doctor and lens manufacturer.
Contact lenses have a maximum wearing life and need to be replaced regularly.


#7 I've tried contacts before, but didn't think they were all that comfortable. Why should I try them again?
Your Doctor is the best person to evaluate your eyes, lifestyle and vision correction needs. The good news is in the past few years many advancements in contact lenses have helped make them even more comfortable. During an eye exam, ask a Doctor if contact lenses are right for you. If you experienced problems in the past, be sure to mention them so the Doctor can take this into consideration and make a recommendation. You just might be surprised at how far contact lenses have come - and how much you might like wearing them.

#5 What is a contact lens?
A contact lens is a very thin piece of sterile, specially-formed material which is placed on the eye as a method of correcting vision. It actually "contacts" with the eye. When the contact lens is placed on the eye, it changes the way that light is focused in the eye, and this change in focus corrects vision.

The material used in the contact lens is carefully produced to allow as much oxygen as possible to get to the surface of your eye, as well as to be as comfortable and safe as possible.

#6 Should I get contact lenses?
Many people who currently wear eyeglasses can wear contact lenses. When you come in for your appointment, Dr. DuBrow or Dr. Newman-Evans can help you decide whether contact lenses are right for you.

Programmed Replacement Soft
These lenses are also called Frequent Replacement Lenses. They are worn on a daily basis and are thrown away after one to three months of wear, as instructed by the optometrist.

Gas Permeable
Gas permeable contact lenses are most often prescribed to patients with astigmatism. The lenses may, however, be prescribed for spherical patients. These lenses are made of a semi-rigid, silicon-based plastic that allows oxygen to pass through the lens and into the cornea. The gas permeable contact lens is more difficult to adjust to due to the rigidity of the lens. It takes about three weeks of wear to become comfortable with the feel of the lens on the eye.

Tint Type Characteristics

Clear
These contact lenses are completely clear, and they can be difficult to see when cleaning and placing in eyes.

Visibility Tint, also called Handling Tint
These lenses have a very light tint (usually blue) to make them easier to see when handling and cleaning. The tint is very light; it does not "tint" your vision and will not change the color of your eyes.
Enhancing Tint
These lenses have a tint which enhances the color of a similarly-colored eye. For example, if you have light blue eyes, a blue-enhancing tint contact lens will make your eyes appear a darker and more intense blue. Your vision is not tinted; the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. If the lens is chosen well, it is usually difficult for others to notice that you are wearing an enhancing tint contact lens. An enhancing tint cannot change eye color to a different hue (from brown to blue, for example). For that, you need an opaque lens.

Opaque
In an opaque tinted contact lens, the part of the lens which covers the colored area of your eye (the iris) is tinted with color so deeply that it blocks out the natural color of your eye. This type of lens can change, for example, brown eyes to blue. Your vision is not tinted - the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. These are also referred to as colored contact lenses.

#9 What if I decide that contact lenses aren't right for me?
Some people experience some difficulty upon their first "contact" with contact lenses. This is normal - after all, you're putting something in your eye!

It's unlikely, but you might decide that contact lenses aren't right for you. If that happens, we'll return the cost of the lenses minus the exam fee. Or, we'll apply the money you spent on contact lenses toward the purchase of any pair of eyeglasses in our store. There are some restrictions to what you can return, so ask for details at the store.
#10 Can contact lenses hurt my eyes?
Properly used and cared for contact lenses are safe for your eyes. Contact lenses are made of special materials which are very gentle to the surface of the eye.

Failure to follow your maintenance plan, wearing your contact lenses for too long, not washing your hands before cleaning them, and/or cleaning them improperly can result in eye irritation or infection.

Your eye health is our number one priority. We will work closely with you to ensure optimum eye health and vision.


Didn't see your question addressed here? Please email David Hazell at FAQs@sharonoptical.center.
Contact Lenses near me
FAQ's
(781) 784-8284,  5 N. Main St  Sharon, MA  02067
#3 Why have I had bad luck with progressive glasses in the past?
Often what people don’t realize is that there are about 300 different brands of progressive lenses and they do not all work the same. The challenge with progressives is that the reading area of the lens is not very wide. And on each side of the usable area is distortion and motion that give you sensations that you “eventually” adapt to.In order to have success with progressive lenses, you have to understand and accept the visual system that it forces you to live within and you have to be able to adapt to the sensations it gives you. The difference between some lenses and others is that the better lenses have wider fields of vision and less peripheral distortion. Of course, they need to be fit and manufactured properly.
#1 What's the difference between digital and analog progressive lens technology?
Digital technology uses Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery. The CNC machine makes thousands of cuts in all the different planes on the back surface of a single vision spherical lens. This is done to a very high degree of accuracy for a specific ophthalmic prescription.  The lens is made for the individual patient and the specific frame. The computer program will calculate the optical performance of thousands of locations covering the progressive lens surface, taking into account many parameters.
#2 What do polarized sunglasses do?
Light reflected from surfaces such as a flat road or smooth water generally is horizontally polarized. This means that instead of light being scattered in all directions in more usual ways, reflected light generally travels in a more horizontally oriented direction. This creates an annoying and sometimes dangerous intensity of light that we experience as glare. When you wear polarized sunglasses, that glare is eliminated and clarity is greatly increased.

#4 What's the best way to take care of my glasses?
First of all, they should either be on your face or in a case. Secondly, the safest most effective way to clean them is to first rinse the glasses under the faucet to remove dust and dirt off the lenses. This is the primary reason they get scratched. Next, put a little amount of dishwashing detergent on your fingers and apply to each lens washing them gently. This will do a great job at cleaning without scratching. When you are done washing, rinse the glasses under the faucet again using your fingers to feel when all the soap is off the lenses. Shake much of the water off the lenses and blot it dry with a soft and absorbent paper towel
If you are out and about and you can’t clean your glasses like this, blow as much of the dust and dirt that you can off the lenses and rub off any smudge you might have with an appropriate cleaning cloth. Be careful - if you have dirt on the lens, you will grind it in with the cloth causing it to scratch.
#5 What is a contact lens?
A contact lens is a very thin piece of sterile, specially-formed material which is placed on the eye as a method of correcting vision. It actually "contacts" with the eye. When the contact lens is placed on the eye, it changes the way that light is focused in the eye, and this change in focus corrects vision.

The material used in the contact lens is carefully produced to allow as much oxygen as possible to get to the surface of your eye, as well as to be as comfortable and safe as possible.
#6 Should I get contact lenses?
Many people who currently wear eyeglasses can wear contact lenses. When you come in for your appointment, Dr. DuBrow or Dr. Newman-Evans can help you decide whether contact lenses are right for you.

Contact lenses have several advantages over eyeglasses. For example:

1. Contact lenses allow some people to see more clearly than with eyeglasses because more of the field of vision is corrected.
2. Contacts are not visible to others and do not interfere with appearance. *
3. Contacts are great for sports: better peripheral vision, fit under helmets.

However, contact lenses take more time and require more responsibility. For example:

Contact lenses do need to be carefully cleaned and maintained according to the instruction of your doctor and lens manufacturer.
Contact lenses have a maximum wearing life and need to be replaced regularly.

#7 I've tried contacts before, but didn't think they were all that comfortable. Why should I try them again?
Your Doctor is the best person to evaluate your eyes, lifestyle and vision correction needs. The good news is in the past few years many advancements in contact lenses have helped make them even more comfortable. During an eye exam, ask a Doctor if contact lenses are right for you. If you experienced problems in the past, be sure to mention them so the Doctor can take this into consideration and make a recommendation. You just might be surprised at how far contact lenses have come - and how much you might like wearing them.
#8 What types of contact lenses are there?
There are two different ways to categorize contact lenses: wear type and tint type. Most wear types come in most tint types, and vice versa.

Wear Type Characteristics

Disposable Contact Lenses
Disposable contact lenses are the most highly-recommended lenses. This type of contact lens offers far more benefits than any other lens type. Disposable contact lenses are worn and discarded every one to two weeks. The lenses require less care than daily wear soft contact lenses, as they are replaced more often. Doctors believe frequent replacement reduces the risk of infection. Disposable contacts are available in several materials, including the latest technology silicon hydrogels.
These lenses can feel very moist compared to other lenses. As a result, they're considered by many people to be more comfortable.

Visual acuity also increases as new lenses are placed in the eye more frequently. These lenses are usually prescribed to be worn daily and removed at night.

Daily Wear Soft Contact Lenses
These lenses are worn on a daily basis and are removed nightly to be cleaned. One pair of daily wear contact lenses will last six months to one year, depending on the practitioner's prescribed wearing schedule. These lenses are handled more frequently, which can result in lost or torn lenses. Toric lenses are also available, for patients who need a correction for astigmatism.

Extended Wear Soft
These lenses are more oxygen-permeable and can sometimes be worn longer than daily wear lenses. Some patients may be able to occasionally sleep in these lenses, but this is determined by the doctor only. The optometrist will set standards for each patient as to how long the lenses should be worn before being removed and cleaned. Since these lenses are handled less frequently, the risk of losing or tearing a lens is somewhat reduced. The lenses, however, are thinner than daily wear soft lenses, and thus must be handled more gently. There is a much higher risk of sight threatening infections with this lens type. Dr. DuBrow and Dr. Newman-Evans rarely recommend this type of lens.
Programmed Replacement Soft
These lenses are also called Frequent Replacement Lenses. They are worn on a daily basis and are thrown away after one to three months of wear, as instructed by the optometrist.

Gas Permeable
Gas permeable contact lenses are most often prescribed to patients with astigmatism. The lenses may, however, be prescribed for spherical patients. These lenses are made of a semi-rigid, silicon-based plastic that allows oxygen to pass through the lens and into the cornea. The gas permeable contact lens is more difficult to adjust to due to the rigidity of the lens. It takes about three weeks of wear to become comfortable with the feel of the lens on the eye.
Tint Type Characteristics

Clear
These contact lenses are completely clear, and they can be difficult to see when cleaning and placing in eyes.

Visibility Tint, also called Handling Tint
These lenses have a very light tint (usually blue) to make them easier to see when handling and cleaning. The tint is very light; it does not "tint" your vision and will not change the color of your eyes.

Enhancing Tint
These lenses have a tint which enhances the color of a similarly-colored eye. For example, if you have light blue eyes, a blue-enhancing tint contact lens will make your eyes appear a darker and more intense blue. Your vision is not tinted; the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. If the lens is chosen well, it is usually difficult for others to notice that you are wearing an enhancing tint contact lens. An enhancing tint cannot change eye color to a different hue (from brown to blue, for example). For that, you need an opaque lens.

Opaque
In an opaque tinted contact lens, the part of the lens which covers the colored area of your eye (the iris) is tinted with color so deeply that it blocks out the natural color of your eye. This type of lens can change, for example, brown eyes to blue. Your vision is not tinted - the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. These are also referred to as colored contact lenses.

#9 What if I decide that contact lenses aren't right for me?
Some people experience some difficulty upon their first "contact" with contact lenses. This is normal - after all, you're putting something in your eye!

It's unlikely, but you might decide that contact lenses aren't right for you. If that happens, we'll return the cost of the lenses minus the exam fee. Or, we'll apply the money you spent on contact lenses toward the purchase of any pair of eyeglasses in our store. There are some restrictions to what you can return, so ask for details at the store.

Contact Lenses near me
FAQ's
(781) 784-8284,  5 N. Main St  Sharon, MA  02067
#3 Why have I had bad luck with progressive glasses in the past?
Often what people don’t realize is that there are about 300 different brands of progressive lenses and they do not all work the same. The challenge with progressives is that the reading area of the lens is not very wide. And on each side of the usable area is distortion and motion that give you sensations that you “eventually” adapt to.In order to have success with progressive lenses, you have to understand and accept the visual system that it forces you to live within and you have to be able to adapt to the sensations it gives you. The difference between some lenses and others is that the better lenses have wider fields of vision and less peripheral distortion. Of course, they need to be fit and manufactured properly.
#1 What's the difference between digital and analog progressive lens technology?
Digital technology uses Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery. The CNC machine makes thousands of cuts in all the different planes on the back surface of a single vision spherical lens. This is done to a very high degree of accuracy for a specific ophthalmic prescription.  The lens is made for the individual patient and the specific frame. The computer program will calculate the optical performance of thousands of locations covering the progressive lens surface, taking into account many parameters.
#2 What do polarized sunglasses do?
Light reflected from surfaces such as a flat road or smooth water generally is horizontally polarized. This means that instead of light being scattered in all directions in more usual ways, reflected light generally travels in a more horizontally oriented direction. This creates an annoying and sometimes dangerous intensity of light that we experience as glare. When you wear polarized sunglasses, that glare is eliminated and clarity is greatly increased.

#4 What's the best way to take care of my glasses?
First of all, they should either be on your face or in a case. Secondly, the safest most effective way to clean them is to first rinse the glasses under the faucet to remove dust and dirt off the lenses. This is the primary reason they get scratched. Next, put a little amount of dishwashing detergent on your fingers and apply to each lens washing them gently. This will do a great job at cleaning without scratching. When you are done washing, rinse the glasses under the faucet again using your fingers to feel when all the soap is off the lenses. Shake much of the water off the lenses and blot it dry with a soft and absorbent paper towel
If you are out and about and you can’t clean your glasses like this, blow as much of the dust and dirt that you can off the lenses and rub off any smudge you might have with an appropriate cleaning cloth. Be careful - if you have dirt on the lens, you will grind it in with the cloth causing it to scratch.
#5 What is a contact lens?
A contact lens is a very thin piece of sterile, specially-formed material which is placed on the eye as a method of correcting vision. It actually "contacts" with the eye. When the contact lens is placed on the eye, it changes the way that light is focused in the eye, and this change in focus corrects vision.

The material used in the contact lens is carefully produced to allow as much oxygen as possible to get to the surface of your eye, as well as to be as comfortable and safe as possible.
#6 Should I get contact lenses?
Many people who currently wear eyeglasses can wear contact lenses. When you come in for your appointment, Dr. DuBrow or Dr. Newman-Evans can help you decide whether contact lenses are right for you.

Contact lenses have several advantages over eyeglasses. For example:

1. Contact lenses allow some people to see more clearly than with eyeglasses because more of the field of vision is corrected.
2. Contacts are not visible to others and do not interfere with appearance. *
3. Contacts are great for sports: better peripheral vision, fit under helmets.

However, contact lenses take more time and require more responsibility. For example:

Contact lenses do need to be carefully cleaned and maintained according to the instruction of your doctor and lens manufacturer.
Contact lenses have a maximum wearing life and need to be replaced regularly.

#7 I've tried contacts before, but didn't think they were all that comfortable. Why should I try them again?
Your Doctor is the best person to evaluate your eyes, lifestyle and vision correction needs. The good news is in the past few years many advancements in contact lenses have helped make them even more comfortable. During an eye exam, ask a Doctor if contact lenses are right for you. If you experienced problems in the past, be sure to mention them so the Doctor can take this into consideration and make a recommendation. You just might be surprised at how far contact lenses have come - and how much you might like wearing them.
#8 What types of contact lenses are there?
There are two different ways to categorize contact lenses: wear type and tint type. Most wear types come in most tint types, and vice versa.

Wear Type Characteristics

Disposable Contact Lenses
Disposable contact lenses are the most highly-recommended lenses. This type of contact lens offers far more benefits than any other lens type. Disposable contact lenses are worn and discarded every one to two weeks. The lenses require less care than daily wear soft contact lenses, as they are replaced more often. Doctors believe frequent replacement reduces the risk of infection. Disposable contacts are available in several materials, including the latest technology silicon hydrogels.
These lenses can feel very moist compared to other lenses. As a result, they're considered by many people to be more comfortable.

Visual acuity also increases as new lenses are placed in the eye more frequently. These lenses are usually prescribed to be worn daily and removed at night.

Daily Wear Soft Contact Lenses
These lenses are worn on a daily basis and are removed nightly to be cleaned. One pair of daily wear contact lenses will last six months to one year, depending on the practitioner's prescribed wearing schedule. These lenses are handled more frequently, which can result in lost or torn lenses. Toric lenses are also available, for patients who need a correction for astigmatism.

Extended Wear Soft
These lenses are more oxygen-permeable and can sometimes be worn longer than daily wear lenses. Some patients may be able to occasionally sleep in these lenses, but this is determined by the doctor only. The optometrist will set standards for each patient as to how long the lenses should be worn before being removed and cleaned. Since these lenses are handled less frequently, the risk of losing or tearing a lens is somewhat reduced. The lenses, however, are thinner than daily wear soft lenses, and thus must be handled more gently. There is a much higher risk of sight threatening infections with this lens type. Dr. DuBrow and Dr. Newman-Evans rarely recommend this type of lens.
Programmed Replacement Soft
These lenses are also called Frequent Replacement Lenses. They are worn on a daily basis and are thrown away after one to three months of wear, as instructed by the optometrist.

Gas Permeable
Gas permeable contact lenses are most often prescribed to patients with astigmatism. The lenses may, however, be prescribed for spherical patients. These lenses are made of a semi-rigid, silicon-based plastic that allows oxygen to pass through the lens and into the cornea. The gas permeable contact lens is more difficult to adjust to due to the rigidity of the lens. It takes about three weeks of wear to become comfortable with the feel of the lens on the eye.
Tint Type Characteristics

Clear
These contact lenses are completely clear, and they can be difficult to see when cleaning and placing in eyes.

Visibility Tint, also called Handling Tint
These lenses have a very light tint (usually blue) to make them easier to see when handling and cleaning. The tint is very light; it does not "tint" your vision and will not change the color of your eyes.

Enhancing Tint
These lenses have a tint which enhances the color of a similarly-colored eye. For example, if you have light blue eyes, a blue-enhancing tint contact lens will make your eyes appear a darker and more intense blue. Your vision is not tinted; the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. If the lens is chosen well, it is usually difficult for others to notice that you are wearing an enhancing tint contact lens. An enhancing tint cannot change eye color to a different hue (from brown to blue, for example). For that, you need an opaque lens.

Opaque
In an opaque tinted contact lens, the part of the lens which covers the colored area of your eye (the iris) is tinted with color so deeply that it blocks out the natural color of your eye. This type of lens can change, for example, brown eyes to blue. Your vision is not tinted - the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. These are also referred to as colored contact lenses.

#9 What if I decide that contact lenses aren't right for me?
Some people experience some difficulty upon their first "contact" with contact lenses. This is normal - after all, you're putting something in your eye!

It's unlikely, but you might decide that contact lenses aren't right for you. If that happens, we'll return the cost of the lenses minus the exam fee. Or, we'll apply the money you spent on contact lenses toward the purchase of any pair of eyeglasses in our store. There are some restrictions to what you can return, so ask for details at the store.

Encompass.marketing
FAQ's
(781) 784-8284,  5 N. Main St  Sharon, MA  02067


#10 Can contact lenses hurt my eyes?
Properly used and cared for contact lenses are safe for your eyes. Contact lenses are made of special materials which are very gentle to the surface of the eye.

Failure to follow your maintenance plan, wearing your contact lenses for too long, not washing your hands before cleaning them, and/or cleaning them improperly can result in eye irritation or infection.

Your eye health is our number one priority. We will work closely with you to ensure optimum eye health and vision.


Didn't see your question addressed here? Please email David Hazell at FAQs@sharonoptical.center.




© Sharon Optical. All Rights Reserved.
Designed by Larry Ross Marketing Services Sharon, MA.
#3 Why have I had bad luck with progressive glasses in the past?
Often what people don’t realize is that there are about 300 different brands of progressive lenses and they do not all work the same. The challenge with progressives is that the reading area of the lens is not very wide. And on each side of the usable area is distortion and motion that give you sensations that you “eventually” adapt to.In order to have success with progressive lenses, you have to understand and accept the visual system that it forces you to live within and you have to be able to adapt to the sensations it gives you. The difference between some lenses and others is that the better lenses have wider fields of vision and less peripheral distortion. Of course, they need to be fit and manufactured properly.
#1 What's the difference between digital and analog progressive lens technology?
Digital technology uses Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery. The CNC machine makes thousands of cuts in all the different planes on the back surface of a single vision spherical lens. This is done to a very high degree of accuracy for a specific ophthalmic prescription.  The lens is made for the individual patient and the specific frame. The computer program will calculate the optical performance of thousands of locations covering the progressive lens surface, taking into account many parameters.
#2 What do polarized sunglasses do?
Light reflected from surfaces such as a flat road or smooth water generally is horizontally polarized. This means that instead of light being scattered in all directions in more usual ways, reflected light generally travels in a more horizontally oriented direction. This creates an annoying and sometimes dangerous intensity of light that we experience as glare. When you wear polarized sunglasses, that glare is eliminated and clarity is greatly increased.

#4 What's the best way to take care of my glasses?
First of all, they should either be on your face or in a case. Secondly, the safest most effective way to clean them is to first rinse the glasses under the faucet to remove dust and dirt off the lenses. This is the primary reason they get scratched. Next, put a little amount of dishwashing detergent on your fingers and apply to each lens washing them gently. This will do a great job at cleaning without scratching. When you are done washing, rinse the glasses under the faucet again using your fingers to feel when all the soap is off the lenses. Shake much of the water off the lenses and blot it dry with a soft and absorbent paper towel
If you are out and about and you can’t clean your glasses like this, blow as much of the dust and dirt that you can off the lenses and rub off any smudge you might have with an appropriate cleaning cloth. Be careful - if you have dirt on the lens, you will grind it in with the cloth causing it to scratch.
#5 What is a contact lens?
A contact lens is a very thin piece of sterile, specially-formed material which is placed on the eye as a method of correcting vision. It actually "contacts" with the eye. When the contact lens is placed on the eye, it changes the way that light is focused in the eye, and this change in focus corrects vision.

The material used in the contact lens is carefully produced to allow as much oxygen as possible to get to the surface of your eye, as well as to be as comfortable and safe as possible.
#6 Should I get contact lenses?
Many people who currently wear eyeglasses can wear contact lenses. When you come in for your appointment, Dr. DuBrow or Dr. Newman-Evans can help you decide whether contact lenses are right for you.

Contact lenses have several advantages over eyeglasses. For example:

1. Contact lenses allow some people to see more clearly than with eyeglasses because more of the field of vision is corrected.
2. Contacts are not visible to others and do not interfere with appearance. *
3. Contacts are great for sports: better peripheral vision, fit under helmets.

However, contact lenses take more time and require more responsibility. For example:

Contact lenses do need to be carefully cleaned and maintained according to the instruction of your doctor and lens manufacturer.
Contact lenses have a maximum wearing life and need to be replaced regularly.

#7 I've tried contacts before, but didn't think they were all that comfortable. Why should I try them again?
Your Doctor is the best person to evaluate your eyes, lifestyle and vision correction needs. The good news is in the past few years many advancements in contact lenses have helped make them even more comfortable. During an eye exam, ask a Doctor if contact lenses are right for you. If you experienced problems in the past, be sure to mention them so the Doctor can take this into consideration and make a recommendation. You just might be surprised at how far contact lenses have come - and how much you might like wearing them.
#8 What types of contact lenses are there?
There are two different ways to categorize contact lenses: wear type and tint type. Most wear types come in most tint types, and vice versa.

Wear Type Characteristics

Disposable Contact Lenses
Disposable contact lenses are the most highly-recommended lenses. This type of contact lens offers far more benefits than any other lens type. Disposable contact lenses are worn and discarded every one to two weeks. The lenses require less care than daily wear soft contact lenses, as they are replaced more often. Doctors believe frequent replacement reduces the risk of infection. Disposable contacts are available in several materials, including the latest technology silicon hydrogels.
These lenses can feel very moist compared to other lenses. As a result, they're considered by many people to be more comfortable.

Visual acuity also increases as new lenses are placed in the eye more frequently. These lenses are usually prescribed to be worn daily and removed at night.

Daily Wear Soft Contact Lenses
These lenses are worn on a daily basis and are removed nightly to be cleaned. One pair of daily wear contact lenses will last six months to one year, depending on the practitioner's prescribed wearing schedule. These lenses are handled more frequently, which can result in lost or torn lenses. Toric lenses are also available, for patients who need a correction for astigmatism.

Extended Wear Soft
These lenses are more oxygen-permeable and can sometimes be worn longer than daily wear lenses. Some patients may be able to occasionally sleep in these lenses, but this is determined by the doctor only. The optometrist will set standards for each patient as to how long the lenses should be worn before being removed and cleaned. Since these lenses are handled less frequently, the risk of losing or tearing a lens is somewhat reduced. The lenses, however, are thinner than daily wear soft lenses, and thus must be handled more gently. There is a much higher risk of sight threatening infections with this lens type. Dr. DuBrow and Dr. Newman-Evans rarely recommend this type of lens.
Programmed Replacement Soft
These lenses are also called Frequent Replacement Lenses. They are worn on a daily basis and are thrown away after one to three months of wear, as instructed by the optometrist.

Gas Permeable
Gas permeable contact lenses are most often prescribed to patients with astigmatism. The lenses may, however, be prescribed for spherical patients. These lenses are made of a semi-rigid, silicon-based plastic that allows oxygen to pass through the lens and into the cornea. The gas permeable contact lens is more difficult to adjust to due to the rigidity of the lens. It takes about three weeks of wear to become comfortable with the feel of the lens on the eye.
Tint Type Characteristics

Clear
These contact lenses are completely clear, and they can be difficult to see when cleaning and placing in eyes.

Visibility Tint, also called Handling Tint
These lenses have a very light tint (usually blue) to make them easier to see when handling and cleaning. The tint is very light; it does not "tint" your vision and will not change the color of your eyes.

Enhancing Tint
These lenses have a tint which enhances the color of a similarly-colored eye. For example, if you have light blue eyes, a blue-enhancing tint contact lens will make your eyes appear a darker and more intense blue. Your vision is not tinted; the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. If the lens is chosen well, it is usually difficult for others to notice that you are wearing an enhancing tint contact lens. An enhancing tint cannot change eye color to a different hue (from brown to blue, for example). For that, you need an opaque lens.

Opaque
In an opaque tinted contact lens, the part of the lens which covers the colored area of your eye (the iris) is tinted with color so deeply that it blocks out the natural color of your eye. This type of lens can change, for example, brown eyes to blue. Your vision is not tinted - the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. These are also referred to as colored contact lenses.

#9 What if I decide that contact lenses aren't right for me?
Some people experience some difficulty upon their first "contact" with contact lenses. This is normal - after all, you're putting something in your eye!

It's unlikely, but you might decide that contact lenses aren't right for you. If that happens, we'll return the cost of the lenses minus the exam fee. Or, we'll apply the money you spent on contact lenses toward the purchase of any pair of eyeglasses in our store. There are some restrictions to what you can return, so ask for details at the store.

Contact Lenses near me
Contact Lenses near me
Contact Lenses near me
Eyeglass repair in Sharon, Eyeglass repair in Sharon, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Sharon,Eyeglass repair near Sharon, MA, Eyeglass repair near Canton,  Eyeglass repair near Canton, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, MA,   Eyeglass repair near me

Eyeglass frame repair near Canton, MA
©2017 Sharon Optical. All Rights Reserved.
Designed by Larry Ross Marketing Services Sharon, MA.
Eye exams in Sharon
We are a full service vision care provider. Each client's experience is tailored to meet their individual needs. From the exam chair to your vision solutions, your satisfaction is our guarantee.
Eyeglass repair Sharon, Eyeglass repair Sharon, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Sharon,Eyeglass repair near Sharon, MA, Eyeglass repair near Canton,  Eyeglass repair near Canton, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, MA,   Eyeglass repair near me
Eyeglass frame repair near Canton, MA
©2017 Sharon Optical. All Rights Reserved.
Designed by Larry Ross Marketing Services Sharon, MA.
Eye exams in Sharon
We are a full service vision care provider. Each client's experience is tailored to meet their individual needs. From the exam chair to your vision solutions, your satisfaction is our guarantee.
Eyeglass repair Sharon, Eyeglass repair Sharon, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Sharon,Eyeglass repair near Sharon, MA, Eyeglass repair near Canton,  Eyeglass repair near Canton, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, MA,   Eyeglass repair near me
Eye exams in Sharon
Eye exams in Sharon
Color Contact Lenses near Stoughton
Contact Lenses near me
5 N. Main St   Sharon, MA 02067
(781) 784-8284
#1 What's the difference between digital and analog progressive lens technology?
Digital technology uses Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery. The CNC machine makes thousands of cuts in all the different planes on the back surface of a single vision spherical lens. This is done to a very high degree of accuracy for a specific ophthalmic prescription.  The lens is made for the individual patient and the specific frame.
The computer program will calculate the optical performance of thousands of locations covering the progressive lens surface, taking into account many parameters.

#2 What do polarized sunglasses do?
Light reflected from surfaces such as a flat road or smooth water generally is horizontally polarized. This means that instead of light being scattered in all directions in more usual ways, reflected light generally travels in a more horizontally oriented direction. This creates an annoying and sometimes dangerous intensity of light that we experience as glare. When you wear polarized sunglasses, that glare is eliminated and clarity is greatly increased.
#3 Why have I had bad luck with progressive glasses in the past?
Often what people don’t realize is that there are about 300 different brands of progressive lenses and they do not all work the same. The challenge with progressives is that the reading area of the lens is not very wide. And on each side of the usable area is distortion and motion that give you sensations that you “eventually” adapt to. In order to have success with progressive lenses, you have to understand and accept the visual system that it forces you to live within and you have to be able to adapt to the sensations it gives you. The difference between some lenses and others is that the better lenses have wider fields of vision and less peripheral distortion. Of course, they need to be fit and manufactured properly.
#4 What's the best way to take care of my glasses?
First of all, they should either be on your face or in a case. Secondly, the safest most effective way to clean them is to first rinse the glasses under the faucet to remove dust and dirt off the lenses. This is the primary reason they get scratched. Next, put a little amount of dishwashing detergent on your fingers and apply to each lens washing them gently. This will do a great job at cleaning without scratching. When you are done washing, rinse the glasses under the faucet again using your fingers to feel when all the soap is off the lenses. Shake much of the water off the lenses and blot it dry with a soft and absorbent paper towel
If you are out and about and you can’t clean your glasses like this, blow as much of the dust and dirt that you can off the lenses and rub off any smudge you might have with an appropriate cleaning cloth. Be careful - if you have dirt on the lens, you will grind it in with the cloth causing it to scratch.
#5 What is a contact lens?
A contact lens is a very thin piece of sterile, specially-formed material which is placed on the eye as a method of correcting vision. It actually "contacts" with the eye. When the contact lens is placed on the eye, it changes the way that light is focused in the eye, and this change in focus corrects vision.

The material used in the contact lens is carefully produced to allow as much oxygen as possible to get to the surface of your eye, as well as to be as comfortable and safe as possible.
1. Contact lenses allow some people to see more clearly than with eyeglasses because more of the field of vision is corrected.
2. Contacts are not visible to others and do not interfere with appearance. *
3. Contacts are great for sports: better peripheral vision, fit under helmets.

However, contact lenses take more time and require more responsibility. For example:

Contact lenses do need to be carefully cleaned and maintained according to the instruction of your doctor and lens manufacturer.
Contact lenses have a maximum wearing life and need to be replaced regularly.

#7 I've tried contacts before, but didn't think they were all that comfortable. Why should I try them again?
Your Doctor is the best person to evaluate your eyes, lifestyle and vision correction needs. The good news is in the past few years many advancements in contact lenses have helped make them even more comfortable. During an eye exam, ask a Doctor if contact lenses are right for you. If you experienced problems in the past, be sure to mention them so the Doctor can take this into consideration and make a recommendation. You just might be surprised at how far contact lenses have come - and how much you might like wearing them.
#8 What types of contact lenses are there?
There are two different ways to categorize contact lenses: wear type and tint type. Most wear types come in most tint types, and vice versa.

Wear Type Characteristics

Disposable Contact Lenses
Disposable contact lenses are the most highly-recommended lenses. This type of contact lens offers far more benefits than any other lens type. Disposable contact lenses are worn and discarded every one to two weeks. The lenses require less care than daily wear soft contact lenses, as they are replaced more often. Doctors believe frequent replacement reduces the risk of infection. Disposable contacts are available in several materials, including the latest technology silicon hydrogels.
These lenses can feel very moist compared to other lenses. As a result, they're considered by many people to be more comfortable.

Visual acuity also increases as new lenses are placed in the eye more frequently. These lenses are usually prescribed to be worn daily and removed at night.

Daily Wear Soft Contact Lenses
These lenses are worn on a daily basis and are removed nightly to be cleaned. One pair of daily wear contact lenses will last six months to one year, depending on the practitioner's prescribed wearing schedule. These lenses are handled more frequently, which can result in lost or torn lenses. Toric lenses are also available, for patients who need a correction for astigmatism.
Opaque
In an opaque tinted contact lens, the part of the lens which covers the colored area of your eye (the iris) is tinted with color so deeply that it blocks out the natural color of your eye. This type of lens can change, for example, brown eyes to blue. Your vision is not tinted - the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. These are also referred to as colored contact lenses.


#9 What if I decide that contact lenses aren't right for me?
Some people experience some difficulty upon their first "contact" with contact lenses. This is normal - after all, you're putting something in your eye!

It's unlikely, but you might decide that contact lenses aren't right for you. If that happens, we'll return the cost of the lenses minus the exam fee. Or, we'll apply the money you spent on contact lenses toward the purchase of any pair of eyeglasses in our store. There are some restrictions to what you can return, so ask for details at the store.
#6 Should I get contact lenses?
Many people who currently wear eyeglasses can wear contact lenses. When you come in for your appointment, Dr. DuBrow or Dr. Newma-Evans can help you decide whether contact lenses are right for you.

Contact lenses have several advantages over eyeglasses. For example:

Color Contact Lenses near Stoughton
Contact Lenses near me
5 N. Main St   Sharon, MA 02067
(781) 784-8284
#1 What's the difference between digital and analog progressive lens technology?
Digital technology uses Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery. The CNC machine makes thousands of cuts in all the different planes on the back surface of a single vision spherical lens. This is done to a very high degree of accuracy for a specific ophthalmic prescription.  The lens is made for the individual patient and the specific frame.
The computer program will calculate the optical performance of thousands of locations covering the progressive lens surface, taking into account many parameters.

#2 What do polarized sunglasses do?
Light reflected from surfaces such as a flat road or smooth water generally is horizontally polarized. This means that instead of light being scattered in all directions in more usual ways, reflected light generally travels in a more horizontally oriented direction. This creates an annoying and sometimes dangerous intensity of light that we experience as glare. When you wear polarized sunglasses, that glare is eliminated and clarity is greatly increased.
#3 Why have I had bad luck with progressive glasses in the past?
Often what people don’t realize is that there are about 300 different brands of progressive lenses and they do not all work the same. The challenge with progressives is that the reading area of the lens is not very wide. And on each side of the usable area is distortion and motion that give you sensations that you “eventually” adapt to. In order to have success with progressive lenses, you have to understand and accept the visual system that it forces you to live within and you have to be able to adapt to the sensations it gives you. The difference between some lenses and others is that the better lenses have wider fields of vision and less peripheral distortion. Of course, they need to be fit and manufactured properly.
#4 What's the best way to take care of my glasses?
First of all, they should either be on your face or in a case. Secondly, the safest most effective way to clean them is to first rinse the glasses under the faucet to remove dust and dirt off the lenses. This is the primary reason they get scratched. Next, put a little amount of dishwashing detergent on your fingers and apply to each lens washing them gently. This will do a great job at cleaning without scratching. When you are done washing, rinse the glasses under the faucet again using your fingers to feel when all the soap is off the lenses. Shake much of the water off the lenses and blot it dry with a soft and absorbent paper towel
If you are out and about and you can’t clean your glasses like this, blow as much of the dust and dirt that you can off the lenses and rub off any smudge you might have with an appropriate cleaning cloth. Be careful - if you have dirt on the lens, you will grind it in with the cloth causing it to scratch.
#5 What is a contact lens?
A contact lens is a very thin piece of sterile, specially-formed material which is placed on the eye as a method of correcting vision. It actually "contacts" with the eye. When the contact lens is placed on the eye, it changes the way that light is focused in the eye, and this change in focus corrects vision.

The material used in the contact lens is carefully produced to allow as much oxygen as possible to get to the surface of your eye, as well as to be as comfortable and safe as possible.
1. Contact lenses allow some people to see more clearly than with eyeglasses because more of the field of vision is corrected.
2. Contacts are not visible to others and do not interfere with appearance. *
3. Contacts are great for sports: better peripheral vision, fit under helmets.

However, contact lenses take more time and require more responsibility. For example:

Contact lenses do need to be carefully cleaned and maintained according to the instruction of your doctor and lens manufacturer.
Contact lenses have a maximum wearing life and need to be replaced regularly.

#7 I've tried contacts before, but didn't think they were all that comfortable. Why should I try them again?
Your Doctor is the best person to evaluate your eyes, lifestyle and vision correction needs. The good news is in the past few years many advancements in contact lenses have helped make them even more comfortable. During an eye exam, ask a Doctor if contact lenses are right for you. If you experienced problems in the past, be sure to mention them so the Doctor can take this into consideration and make a recommendation. You just might be surprised at how far contact lenses have come - and how much you might like wearing them.
#8 What types of contact lenses are there?
There are two different ways to categorize contact lenses: wear type and tint type. Most wear types come in most tint types, and vice versa.

Wear Type Characteristics

Disposable Contact Lenses
Disposable contact lenses are the most highly-recommended lenses. This type of contact lens offers far more benefits than any other lens type. Disposable contact lenses are worn and discarded every one to two weeks. The lenses require less care than daily wear soft contact lenses, as they are replaced more often. Doctors believe frequent replacement reduces the risk of infection. Disposable contacts are available in several materials, including the latest technology silicon hydrogels.
These lenses can feel very moist compared to other lenses. As a result, they're considered by many people to be more comfortable.

Visual acuity also increases as new lenses are placed in the eye more frequently. These lenses are usually prescribed to be worn daily and removed at night.

Daily Wear Soft Contact Lenses
These lenses are worn on a daily basis and are removed nightly to be cleaned. One pair of daily wear contact lenses will last six months to one year, depending on the practitioner's prescribed wearing schedule. These lenses are handled more frequently, which can result in lost or torn lenses. Toric lenses are also available, for patients who need a correction for astigmatism.
Opaque
In an opaque tinted contact lens, the part of the lens which covers the colored area of your eye (the iris) is tinted with color so deeply that it blocks out the natural color of your eye. This type of lens can change, for example, brown eyes to blue. Your vision is not tinted - the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. These are also referred to as colored contact lenses.


#9 What if I decide that contact lenses aren't right for me?
Some people experience some difficulty upon their first "contact" with contact lenses. This is normal - after all, you're putting something in your eye!

It's unlikely, but you might decide that contact lenses aren't right for you. If that happens, we'll return the cost of the lenses minus the exam fee. Or, we'll apply the money you spent on contact lenses toward the purchase of any pair of eyeglasses in our store. There are some restrictions to what you can return, so ask for details at the store.
#6 Should I get contact lenses?
Many people who currently wear eyeglasses can wear contact lenses. When you come in for your appointment, Dr. DuBrow or Dr. Newman-Evans can help you decide whether contact lenses are right for you.

Contact lenses have several advantages over eyeglasses. For example:

Color Contact Lenses near Stoughton
Contact Lenses near me
5 N. Main St   Sharon, MA 02067
(781) 784-8284
#1 What's the difference between digital and analog progressive lens technology?
Digital technology uses Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery. The CNC machine makes thousands of cuts in all the different planes on the back surface of a single vision spherical lens. This is done to a very high degree of accuracy for a specific ophthalmic prescription.  The lens is made for the individual patient and the specific frame.
The computer program will calculate the optical performance of thousands of locations covering the progressive lens surface, taking into account many parameters.

#2 What do polarized sunglasses do?
Light reflected from surfaces such as a flat road or smooth water generally is horizontally polarized. This means that instead of light being scattered in all directions in more usual ways, reflected light generally travels in a more horizontally oriented direction. This creates an annoying and sometimes dangerous intensity of light that we experience as glare. When you wear polarized sunglasses, that glare is eliminated and clarity is greatly increased.
#3 Why have I had bad luck with progressive glasses in the past?
Often what people don’t realize is that there are about 300 different brands of progressive lenses and they do not all work the same. The challenge with progressives is that the reading area of the lens is not very wide. And on each side of the usable area is distortion and motion that give you sensations that you “eventually” adapt to. In order to have success with progressive lenses, you have to understand and accept the visual system that it forces you to live within and you have to be able to adapt to the sensations it gives you. The difference between some lenses and others is that the better lenses have wider fields of vision and less peripheral distortion. Of course, they need to be fit and manufactured properly.
#4 What's the best way to take care of my glasses?
First of all, they should either be on your face or in a case. Secondly, the safest most effective way to clean them is to first rinse the glasses under the faucet to remove dust and dirt off the lenses. This is the primary reason they get scratched. Next, put a little amount of dishwashing detergent on your fingers and apply to each lens washing them gently. This will do a great job at cleaning without scratching. When you are done washing, rinse the glasses under the faucet again using your fingers to feel when all the soap is off the lenses. Shake much of the water off the lenses and blot it dry with a soft and absorbent paper towel
If you are out and about and you can’t clean your glasses like this, blow as much of the dust and dirt that you can off the lenses and rub off any smudge you might have with an appropriate cleaning cloth. Be careful - if you have dirt on the lens, you will grind it in with the cloth causing it to scratch.
#5 What is a contact lens?
A contact lens is a very thin piece of sterile, specially-formed material which is placed on the eye as a method of correcting vision. It actually "contacts" with the eye. When the contact lens is placed on the eye, it changes the way that light is focused in the eye, and this change in focus corrects vision.

The material used in the contact lens is carefully produced to allow as much oxygen as possible to get to the surface of your eye, as well as to be as comfortable and safe as possible.
1. Contact lenses allow some people to see more clearly than with eyeglasses because more of the field of vision is corrected.
2. Contacts are not visible to others and do not interfere with appearance. *
3. Contacts are great for sports: better peripheral vision, fit under helmets.

However, contact lenses take more time and require more responsibility. For example:

Contact lenses do need to be carefully cleaned and maintained according to the instruction of your doctor and lens manufacturer.
Contact lenses have a maximum wearing life and need to be replaced regularly.

#7 I've tried contacts before, but didn't think they were all that comfortable. Why should I try them again?
Your Doctor is the best person to evaluate your eyes, lifestyle and vision correction needs. The good news is in the past few years many advancements in contact lenses have helped make them even more comfortable. During an eye exam, ask a Doctor if contact lenses are right for you. If you experienced problems in the past, be sure to mention them so the Doctor can take this into consideration and make a recommendation. You just might be surprised at how far contact lenses have come - and how much you might like wearing them.
#8 What types of contact lenses are there?
There are two different ways to categorize contact lenses: wear type and tint type. Most wear types come in most tint types, and vice versa.

Wear Type Characteristics

Disposable Contact Lenses
Disposable contact lenses are the most highly-recommended lenses. This type of contact lens offers far more benefits than any other lens type. Disposable contact lenses are worn and discarded every one to two weeks. The lenses require less care than daily wear soft contact lenses, as they are replaced more often. Doctors believe frequent replacement reduces the risk of infection. Disposable contacts are available in several materials, including the latest technology silicon hydrogels.
These lenses can feel very moist compared to other lenses. As a result, they're considered by many people to be more comfortable.

Visual acuity also increases as new lenses are placed in the eye more frequently. These lenses are usually prescribed to be worn daily and removed at night.

Daily Wear Soft Contact Lenses
These lenses are worn on a daily basis and are removed nightly to be cleaned. One pair of daily wear contact lenses will last six months to one year, depending on the practitioner's prescribed wearing schedule. These lenses are handled more frequently, which can result in lost or torn lenses. Toric lenses are also available, for patients who need a correction for astigmatism.
Opaque
In an opaque tinted contact lens, the part of the lens which covers the colored area of your eye (the iris) is tinted with color so deeply that it blocks out the natural color of your eye. This type of lens can change, for example, brown eyes to blue. Your vision is not tinted - the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. These are also referred to as colored contact lenses.


#9 What if I decide that contact lenses aren't right for me?
Some people experience some difficulty upon their first "contact" with contact lenses. This is normal - after all, you're putting something in your eye!

It's unlikely, but you might decide that contact lenses aren't right for you. If that happens, we'll return the cost of the lenses minus the exam fee. Or, we'll apply the money you spent on contact lenses toward the purchase of any pair of eyeglasses in our store. There are some restrictions to what you can return, so ask for details at the store.
#6 Should I get contact lenses?
Many people who currently wear eyeglasses can wear contact lenses. When you come in for your appointment, Dr. DuBrow or Dr. Newman-Evans can help you decide whether contact lenses are right for you.

Contact lenses have several advantages over eyeglasses. For example:

Color Contact Lenses near Stoughton
Contact Lenses near me
5 N. Main St   Sharon, MA 02067
(781) 784-8284
#1 What's the difference between digital and analog progressive lens technology?
Digital technology uses Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) machinery. The CNC machine makes thousands of cuts in all the different planes on the back surface of a single vision spherical lens. This is done to a very high degree of accuracy for a specific ophthalmic prescription.  The lens is made for the individual patient and the specific frame.
The computer program will calculate the optical performance of thousands of locations covering the progressive lens surface, taking into account many parameters.

#2 What do polarized sunglasses do?
Light reflected from surfaces such as a flat road or smooth water generally is horizontally polarized. This means that instead of light being scattered in all directions in more usual ways, reflected light generally travels in a more horizontally oriented direction. This creates an annoying and sometimes dangerous intensity of light that we experience as glare. When you wear polarized sunglasses, that glare is eliminated and clarity is greatly increased.
#3 Why have I had bad luck with progressive glasses in the past?
Often what people don’t realize is that there are about 300 different brands of progressive lenses and they do not all work the same. The challenge with progressives is that the reading area of the lens is not very wide. And on each side of the usable area is distortion and motion that give you sensations that you “eventually” adapt to. In order to have success with progressive lenses, you have to understand and accept the visual system that it forces you to live within and you have to be able to adapt to the sensations it gives you. The difference between some lenses and others is that the better lenses have wider fields of vision and less peripheral distortion. Of course, they need to be fit and manufactured properly.
#4 What's the best way to take care of my glasses?
First of all, they should either be on your face or in a case. Secondly, the safest most effective way to clean them is to first rinse the glasses under the faucet to remove dust and dirt off the lenses. This is the primary reason they get scratched. Next, put a little amount of dishwashing detergent on your fingers and apply to each lens washing them gently. This will do a great job at cleaning without scratching. When you are done washing, rinse the glasses under the faucet again using your fingers to feel when all the soap is off the lenses. Shake much of the water off the lenses and blot it dry with a soft and absorbent paper towel
If you are out and about and you can’t clean your glasses like this, blow as much of the dust and dirt that you can off the lenses and rub off any smudge you might have with an appropriate cleaning cloth. Be careful - if you have dirt on the lens, you will grind it in with the cloth causing it to scratch.
#5 What is a contact lens?
A contact lens is a very thin piece of sterile, specially-formed material which is placed on the eye as a method of correcting vision. It actually "contacts" with the eye. When the contact lens is placed on the eye, it changes the way that light is focused in the eye, and this change in focus corrects vision.

The material used in the contact lens is carefully produced to allow as much oxygen as possible to get to the surface of your eye, as well as to be as comfortable and safe as possible.
1. Contact lenses allow some people to see more clearly than with eyeglasses because more of the field of vision is corrected.
2. Contacts are not visible to others and do not interfere with appearance. *
3. Contacts are great for sports: better peripheral vision, fit under helmets.

However, contact lenses take more time and require more responsibility. For example:

Contact lenses do need to be carefully cleaned and maintained according to the instruction of your doctor and lens manufacturer.
Contact lenses have a maximum wearing life and need to be replaced regularly.

#7 I've tried contacts before, but didn't think they were all that comfortable. Why should I try them again?
Your Doctor is the best person to evaluate your eyes, lifestyle and vision correction needs. The good news is in the past few years many advancements in contact lenses have helped make them even more comfortable. During an eye exam, ask a Doctor if contact lenses are right for you. If you experienced problems in the past, be sure to mention them so the Doctor can take this into consideration and make a recommendation. You just might be surprised at how far contact lenses have come - and how much you might like wearing them.
#8 What types of contact lenses are there?
There are two different ways to categorize contact lenses: wear type and tint type. Most wear types come in most tint types, and vice versa.

Wear Type Characteristics

Disposable Contact Lenses
Disposable contact lenses are the most highly-recommended lenses. This type of contact lens offers far more benefits than any other lens type. Disposable contact lenses are worn and discarded every one to two weeks. The lenses require less care than daily wear soft contact lenses, as they are replaced more often. Doctors believe frequent replacement reduces the risk of infection. Disposable contacts are available in several materials, including the latest technology silicon hydrogels.
These lenses can feel very moist compared to other lenses. As a result, they're considered by many people to be more comfortable.


Visual acuity also increases as new lenses are placed in the eye more frequently. These lenses are usually prescribed to be worn daily and removed at night.

Daily Wear Soft Contact Lenses
These lenses are worn on a daily basis and are removed nightly to be cleaned. One pair of daily wear contact lenses will last six months to one year, depending on the practitioner's prescribed wearing schedule. These lenses are handled more frequently, which can result in lost or torn lenses. Toric lenses are also available, for patients who need a correction for astigmatism.
Opaque
In an opaque tinted contact lens, the part of the lens which covers the colored area of your eye (the iris) is tinted with color so deeply that it blocks out the natural color of your eye. This type of lens can change, for example, brown eyes to blue. Your vision is not tinted - the central part of the lens that you see through (the pupil) is kept clear. These are also referred to as colored contact lenses.


#9 What if I decide that contact lenses aren't right for me?
Some people experience some difficulty upon their first "contact" with contact lenses. This is normal - after all, you're putting something in your eye!

It's unlikely, but you might decide that contact lenses aren't right for you. If that happens, we'll return the cost of the lenses minus the exam fee. Or, we'll apply the money you spent on contact lenses toward the purchase of any pair of eyeglasses in our store. There are some restrictions to what you can return, so ask for details at the store.
#6 Should I get contact lenses?
Many people who currently wear eyeglasses can wear contact lenses. When you come in for your appointment, Dr. DuBrow or Dr. Newman-Evans can help you decide whether contact lenses are right for you.

Contact lenses have several advantages over eyeglasses. For example:



#10 Can contact lenses hurt my eyes?
Properly used and cared for contact lenses are safe for your eyes. Contact lenses are made of special materials which are very gentle to the surface of the eye.

Failure to follow your maintenance plan, wearing your contact lenses for too long, not washing your hands before cleaning them, and/or cleaning them improperly can result in eye irritation or infection.

Your eye health is our number one priority. We will work closely with you to ensure optimum eye health and vision.


Didn't see your question addressed here? Please email David Hazell at FAQs@sharonoptical.center.






#10 Can contact lenses hurt my eyes?
Properly used and cared for contact lenses are safe for your eyes. Contact lenses are made of special materials which are very gentle to the surface of the eye.

Failure to follow your maintenance plan, wearing your contact lenses for too long, not washing your hands before cleaning them, and/or cleaning them improperly can result in eye irritation or infection.

Your eye health is our number one priority. We will work closely with you to ensure optimum eye health and vision.


Didn't see your question addressed here? Please email David Hazell at FAQs@sharonoptical.center.




#10 Can contact lenses hurt my eyes?
Properly used and cared for contact lenses are safe for your eyes. Contact lenses are made of special materials which are very gentle to the surface of the eye.

Failure to follow your maintenance plan, wearing your contact lenses for too long, not washing your hands before cleaning them, and/or cleaning them improperly can result in eye irritation or infection.

Your eye health is our number one priority. We will work closely with you to ensure optimum eye health and vision.


Didn't see your question addressed here? Please email David Hazell at FAQs@sharonoptical.center.

Eyeglass frame repair near Canton, MA
©2017 Sharon Optical. All Rights Reserved.
Designed by Larry Ross Marketing Services Sharon, MA.
Eye exams in Sharon
We are a full service vision care provider. Each client's experience is tailored to meet their individual needs. From the exam chair to your vision solutions, your satisfaction is our guarantee.
Eyeglass repair Sharon, Eyeglass repair Sharon, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Sharon,Eyeglass repair near Sharon, MA, Eyeglass repair near Canton,  Eyeglass repair near Canton, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, MA,   Eyeglass repair near me
#10 Can contact lenses hurt my eyes?
Properly used and cared for contact lenses are safe for your eyes. Contact lenses are made of special materials which are very gentle to the surface of the eye.

Failure to follow your maintenance plan, wearing your contact lenses for too long, not washing your hands before cleaning them, and/or cleaning them improperly can result in eye irritation or infection.

Your eye health is our number one priority. We will work closely with you to ensure optimum eye health and vision.


Didn't see your question addressed here? Please email David Hazell at FAQs@sharonoptical.center.

Eyeglass frame repair near Canton, MA
©2017 Sharon Optical. All Rights Reserved.
Designed by Larry Ross Marketing Services Sharon, MA.
Eye exams in Sharon
We are a full service vision care provider. Each client's experience is tailored to meet their individual needs. From the exam chair to your vision solutions, your satisfaction is our guarantee.
Eyeglass repair Sharon, Eyeglass repair Sharon, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Sharon,Eyeglass repair near Sharon, MA, Eyeglass repair near Canton,  Eyeglass repair near Canton, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, MA,   Eyeglass repair near me
#10 Can contact lenses hurt my eyes?
Properly used and cared for contact lenses are safe for your eyes. Contact lenses are made of special materials which are very gentle to the surface of the eye.

Failure to follow your maintenance plan, wearing your contact lenses for too long, not washing your hands before cleaning them, and/or cleaning them improperly can result in eye irritation or infection.

Your eye health is our number one priority. We will work closely with you to ensure optimum eye health and vision.


Didn't see your question addressed here? Please email David Hazell at FAQs@sharonoptical.center.

Eyeglass frame repair near Canton, MA
©2017 Sharon Optical. All Rights Reserved.
Designed by Larry Ross Marketing Services Sharon, MA.
Eye exams in Sharon
We are a full service vision care provider. Each client's experience is tailored to meet their individual needs. From the exam chair to your vision solutions, your satisfaction is our guarantee.
Eyeglass repair Sharon, Eyeglass repair Sharon, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Sharon,Eyeglass repair near Sharon, MA, Eyeglass repair near Canton,  Eyeglass repair near Canton, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, MA,   Eyeglass repair near me
#10 Can contact lenses hurt my eyes?
Properly used and cared for contact lenses are safe for your eyes. Contact lenses are made of special materials which are very gentle to the surface of the eye.

Failure to follow your maintenance plan, wearing your contact lenses for too long, not washing your hands before cleaning them, and/or cleaning them improperly can result in eye irritation or infection.

Your eye health is our number one priority. We will work closely with you to ensure optimum eye health and vision.


Didn't see your question addressed here? Please email David Hazell at FAQs@sharonoptical.center.

Eyeglass frame repair near Canton, MA
©2017 Sharon Optical. All Rights Reserved.
Designed by Larry Ross Marketing Services Sharon, MA.
Eye exams in Sharon
We are a full service vision care provider. Each client's experience is tailored to meet their individual needs. From the exam chair to your vision solutions, your satisfaction is our guarantee.
Eyeglass repair Sharon, Eyeglass repair Sharon, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Sharon,Eyeglass repair near Sharon, MA, Eyeglass repair near Canton,  Eyeglass repair near Canton, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, MA,   Eyeglass repair near me
#10 Can contact lenses hurt my eyes?
Properly used and cared for contact lenses are safe for your eyes. Contact lenses are made of special materials which are very gentle to the surface of the eye.

Failure to follow your maintenance plan, wearing your contact lenses for too long, not washing your hands before cleaning them, and/or cleaning them improperly can result in eye irritation or infection.

Your eye health is our number one priority. We will work closely with you to ensure optimum eye health and vision.


Didn't see your question addressed here? Please email David Hazell at FAQs@sharonoptical.center.
©2017 Sharon Optical. All Rights Reserved.
Designed by Larry Ross Marketing Services Sharon, MA.
We are a full service vision care provider. Each client's experience is tailored to meet their individual needs. From the exam chair to your vision solutions, your satisfaction is our guarantee.
Eyeglass repair Sharon, Eyeglass repair Sharon, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Sharon,Eyeglass repair near Sharon, MA, Eyeglass repair near Canton,  Eyeglass repair near Canton, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, MA,   Eyeglass repair near me
Encompass.marketing
Color Contact Lenses near me
©2017 Sharon Optical. All Rights Reserved.
Designed by Larry Ross Marketing Services Sharon, MA.
We are a full service vision care provider. Each client's experience is tailored to meet their individual needs. From the exam chair to your vision solutions, your satisfaction is our guarantee.
Eyeglass repair Sharon, Eyeglass repair Sharon, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Sharon,Eyeglass repair near Sharon, MA, Eyeglass repair near Canton,  Eyeglass repair near Canton, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, MA,   Eyeglass repair near me
Encompass.marketing
Color Contact Lenses near me
©2017 Sharon Optical. All Rights Reserved.
Designed by Larry Ross Marketing Services Sharon, MA.
We are a full service vision care provider. Each client's experience is tailored to meet their individual needs. From the exam chair to your vision solutions, your satisfaction is our guarantee.
Eyeglass repair Sharon, Eyeglass repair Sharon, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Sharon,Eyeglass repair near Sharon, MA, Eyeglass repair near Canton,  Eyeglass repair near Canton, MA,  Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, Eyeglass repair near Stoughton, MA,   Eyeglass repair near me
We are a full service vision care provider. Each client's experience is tailored to meet their individual needs. From the exam chair to your vision solutions, your satisfaction is our guarantee.